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What is translation after translation? Is translation a kind of hallucination, of seeing and hearing what is there and isn't there?
Curator, translator, and Dar Al-Ma'mun co-director Omar Berrada.

17-18.3.2013
MATHAF: ARAB MUSEUM OF MODERN ART
DOHA

20-23.3.2013
ART DUBAI, MADINAT JUMEIRAH
DUBAI

Featuring commissioned projects and research, as well as six days of live talks, the Global Art Forum brought together a diverse line-up of participants, including artists, curators, musicians, strategists, thinkers and writers.

Founded and produced by Art Dubai, Global Art Forum was presented by the Dubai Culture and Arts Authority (Dubai Culture), and held in partnership with Mathaf: Arab Museum of Modern Art (Qatar Museums Authority).

In 2013, the seventh iteration of the Global Art Forum was directed by Istanbul based writer/editor HG Masters, and commissioned by writer/curator Shumon Basar. Entitled 'It Means This', the forum explored the concept of 'definitionism': investigating the words, terms, clichés and misunderstandings that proliferate in the art world and beyond. The Forum attempted to (re)define words, phrases and ideas we think we know, and those we need to know, to navigate the 21st century.

Mosireen Subtitling Workshop, 30 April 2014, held at ADEF (Arab Digital Expression Foundation), Cairo

This workshop was held for activist subtitlers, particularly those associated with Mosireen, and coordinated by Katharine Halls, Salma El-Tarzi and Danya Nada. It was delivered by Dr Luis Perez-Gonzalez and introduced by Professor Mona Baker, both from the University of Manchester, UK

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This is the second lecture given by Ed Bice, CEO of Meedan, as part of a translation workshop held by the House of Translation, AUC, and the National Center for Translation, Egyptian Ministry of Culture. It followed the ceremony of the National Center for Translation where certificates were handed out to workshop applicants.

This is the first lecture given by Ed Bice, CEO of Meedan, as part of a translation workshop held by the House of Translation, AUC, and the National Center for Translation, Egyptian Ministry of Culture.

This is the summary of Toward a Translation Criticism: John Donne (Translation Studies) by Antoine Berman, Francoise Massardier-Kenney.

Edward Said interviewed by Salman Rushdie at the Institute of Contemporary Arts in London (September 1986).

Lecture given by the late Professor Martha Cheung, Hong Kong Bapitst University, at GuangDong University of Foreign Studies, China.

Title: From the Sublime to the Ridiculous – Some Thoughts on Literary Translation

Date: 13 November 2008

This talk was delivered at the Researching Conflict workshop co-organised by the Centre for Translation & Intercultural Studies at the University of Manchester, UK (see http://www.methods.manchester.ac.uk/events/2013-04-18/index.shtml). Using specific examples from personal research practice, Professor Footitt examines four questions relating to war/ conflict research. Firstly, she considers the nature of Archives as symbols/forces of power, and explores their limitations for conflict research, with particular emphasis on the ‘missingness’ and ‘serendipity’ of Archives. Secondly, she looks at the experience of ‘growing one's own archive’, developing an eclectic and organic approach to constituting an archive of practice (including types of archives, personal papers, newspapers, oral history, interviews, maps, photographs, memorabilia, cultural production). Thirdly, she suggests pathways of analysis through this new archive, with an emphasis on following processes, and seeing narrative cartographies. Finally, the talk engages with questions relating to ethics and the archive, in particular arguing for an ethics of attention and linguistic respect.

* Bandita: an image (suggested by Linda Singer) of the writer as intellectual outlaw, raiding the texts of others, and taking what she finds most useful: ‘The remains recycled make a different map, and mark new intersections between discourses, disciplines, forms of “knowledge” ’ ( L. Singer, Erotic Welfare: Sexual Theory and Politics in the Age of Epidemic. New York: Routledge, 1993, 22).

This talk was delivered at the Researching Conflict workshop co-organised by the Centre for Translation & Intercultural Studies at the University of Manchester, UK (see http://www.methods.manchester.ac.uk/events/2013-04-18/index.shtml). Ethical codes for conducting research - such as informed consent - are predominantly individualistic and devised for conventional research settings and outputs. Research on conflict, or in post conflict settings, often takes place on different terms. This presentation discusses three challenges associated with conducting such research. (1) Relationships between interviewer, interviewee and community. (2) Negotiating shifting patterns of violence and conflict. (3) Control and ownership of testimony and research in a media age. Through a discussion of these challenges the presentation offers  some thoughts on what constitutes an 'enabling ethics' for conflict research.

Bolette Blaagaard is Assistant Professor at Aalborg University, Denmark and former Research Fellow at City University, London, where she was involved in setting up an international network to debate issues of citizenship and journalism, as well as carrying out research on citizen journalism and its implications for journalistic practices and education. The talk was delivered on 14 June 2013 as part of 'Citizen Media Colloquium', organised by the Centre for Translation and Intercultural Studies, University of Manchester.

Stuart Allan is Professor of Journalism in the Media School, Bournemouth University, UK, where he is also the Director of the Centre for Journalism and Communication Research. The talk was delivered on 13 June 2013 as part of 'Citizen Media Colloquium', organised by the Centre for Translation and Intercultural Studies, University of Manchester.

Mona Baker is Professor of Translation Studies at the Centre for Translation and Intercultural Studies, University of Manchester. She is author of In Other Words: A Coursebook on Translation(1992; second edition 2011) and Translation and Conflict: A Narrative Account(2006), The talk was delivered on 13 June 2013 as part of 'Citizen Media Colloquium', organised by the Centre for Translation and Intercultural Studies, University of Manchester.

Stephen Ennis is Russian Media Analyst at BBC Monitoring, a branch of the BBC that monitors foreign broadcasts and other forms media activity. The talk was delivered on 13 June 2013 as part of 'Citizen Media Colloquium', organised by the Centre for Translation and Intercultural Studies, University of Manchester.

This talk examines both the experience of Global Voices in constituting and sustaining a large, multilingual and transnational online community, and look to other examples and experiences.

Ivan Sigal is Executive Director of Global Voices. He is author of White Road (Steidl Verlag 2012) and has extensive experience in supporting and training journalists and working on media co-productions in the Soviet Union and Asia.The talk was delivered on 14 June 2013 as part of 'CITIZEN MEDIA COLLOQUIUM', organised by the Centre for Translation and Intercultural Studies, University of Manchester.

Intermediality refers to interconnectedness. As a means of expression and exchange, languages depend on, and refer to, various text types and increasingly draw on different media. Signed languages depend on the interconnectedness between the signed modality and the speech modality, as evidenced through language contact between, for example, English and British Sign Language (BSL) in the form of mouthing and fingerspelling. Signed language interpreting relies on bimodality as practitioners move between two language forms, and training of signed language interpreters has benefitted from the digital age with the availability of video media. But what of the interconnectedness between signed and spoken language interpreting? Facility with language can be extended by exposing students to bimodal language learning, and to various media to enhance their understanding of how languages work in context, thus equipping them with a greater means of expression and exchange. These ideas will be discussed within the context of the new innovative undergraduate programme at Heriot-Watt University, which enables interpreting students to study BSL alongside another spoken language.

Professor Jemina Napier is Chair of Intercultural Communication in the Department of Languages & Intercultural Studies in the School of Management and Languages, Heriot-Watt University. The talk was delivered on 16 May 2013 as part of the conference 'TRANSLATING AND INTERPRETING ACROSS MEDIA: Exploring the Relevance of (Inter)mediality for Language Pedagogy', organised by the Centre for Translation and Intercultural Studies, University of Manchester.

In this presentation, Dr Karin Littau will attempt two things. The first is to outline the landscape or, as Marshall McLuhan called it, the ‘environment’ of intermediality. The second is to locate the role and nature of translation in this environment, especially in view of the fact that this environment is rapidly changing. If intermediality is that state in which there is no settled dominant medium but always several interrelated media, remediating, transforming and jostling one another in directions unsupported by a host medium, then translation occupies the role of the bond between them. As will become clear, this role due to the nature of the media concerned, is not predominantly linguistic; but neither for that reason is it not translation. The question for translation, as for cultural production in general, is how is it remediated in the intermedial landscape in which it acts.

Dr Karin Littau teaches in the Department of Literature, Film, and Theatre Studies at the University of Essex. The talk was delivered on 16 May 2013 as part of the conference 'TRANSLATING AND INTERPRETING ACROSS MEDIA: Exploring the Relevance of (Inter)mediality for Language Pedagogy', organised by the Centre for Translation and Intercultural Studies, University of Manchester.

Theatre presents a multifaceted site for the study of translation. The range of collaborative activity and terminology around translation for the theatre demonstrates the differing degrees of agency and visibility that constitute the translational act. Furthermore, the performance aspects of theatre techniques can inform the process of translation beyond those pages destined for the stage. This presentation investigates the role of performance in translation, exploring the significance of translation/version/adaptation terminology within theatre and what it reveals, or conceals, about the agency of the translator(s) and collaborative theatre practices. I will suggest that these elements of theatre translation can not only be applied when researching other specialisms within translation and interpretation, but can also assist in the teaching and learning of translation.

Dr Geraldine Brodie teaches Translation Studies and supervises the SELCS Writing Lab at UCL. The talk was delivered on 16 May 2013 as part of the conference 'TRANSLATING AND INTERPRETING ACROSS MEDIA: Exploring the Relevance of (Inter)mediality for Language Pedagogy', organised by the Centre for Translation and Intercultural Studies, University of Manchester.

To date, Graeco-Arabic scholarship has firmly remained in a twentieth-century paradigm: individual scholars investigated how specific Greek texts were rendered into Arabic. In doing so, they largely relied on analysis done by hand, in the sense that they compiled glossaries by hand, and identified certain syntactical patterns in the source and target texts. In adjacent fields, however, scholars have developed a whole host of computer-aided techniques to analyse electronic corpora, including bilingual corpora of source and target texts.

The challenge today is to use the advanced techniques of computer-aided corpus linguistics in the area of Graeco-Arabic studies. This novel approach will undoubtedly revolutionise the field, and move it to a new, twenty-first century paradigm. In this talk, Professor Pormann offers an overview of traditional Graeco-Arabic scholarship and highlights areas that would allow for the application and further developments of corpus tools in this area.

Professor Peter Pormann is principal Investigator in the ERC-funded project  ‘Arabic Commentaries on the Hippocratic Aphorisms’. The talk was delivered on 17th November 2012 during the workshop 'Travelling Theory in the Sciences and Humanities: Corpus Tools and Methodologies for Tracing the Mutation and Transformation of Concepts in (Re)translated Texts' organised by the Centre for Translation & Intercultural Studies, University of Manchester.

This presentation outlines the goals and methodologies of a multi-disciplinary team project titled 'Translation Arrays: Version Variation Visualization' (VVV), supported by the AHRC 'Digital Transformations' theme (Jan-Sept '12). It will demonstrate innovative online tools created for exploring multiple versions of literary works, including translations. A prototype VVV platform is available online. VVV has been featured on the BBC and in a detailed report in the technoculture magazine Wired.

With internal bridge funding from Swansea University, the team is now preparing a January 2013 application for an AHRC 'theme large grant', to scale up the project and create new global resources for intercultural research, education, and creativity. The aims of the project are: acquiring large multilingual corpora of versions of works by Shakespeare, and other 'world heritage' works including scriptures; developing platform functionalities including more text-work and analysis tools, more visualisation options, more user interactivity, more structured metadata; creating research-based educational outputs including game-like multimedia interfaces; making the platform interoperable with social media and the semantic web; and as an independent project, developing an observatory-archive of world-wide translating, versioning and adapting.

Dr. Tom Cheesman is principal Investigator on the collaborative, multi-disciplinary ‘Version Variation Visualisation’ project, which involves analysis of the multiplicity of Shakespeare re-translations. The talk was delivered on 17 Novemeber 2012 during the workshop 'Travelling Theory in the Sciences and Humanities: Corpus Tools and Methodologies for Tracing the Mutation and Transformation of Concepts in (Re)translated Texts' organised by the Centre for Translation Studies, University of Manchester.

This talk examines connections -- some actual, some notional -- between the use of corpora in language research and the discipline of information visualisation. Starting with a brief review of information visualisation techniques, Dr. Luz discusses how these techniques have been used in text analysis and ‘data mining’, focusing on corpus research and translation studies in particular. These discussions are illustrated with the presentation of visualisation prototypes being developed in connection with the Translational English Corpus (TEC) and a number of case studies.

Dr. Saturnino Luz is principal Investigator on the collaborative, multi-disciplinary ‘Version Variation Visualisation’ project, which involves analysis of the multiplicity of Shakespeare re-translations. The talk was delivered on 17 November 2012 as part of the workshop 'Travelling Theory in the Sciences and Humanities: Corpus Tools and Methodologies for Tracing the Mutation and Transformation of Concepts in (Re)translated Texts', organised by the Centre for Translation and Intercultural Studies, University of Manchester.

The video last just over an hour.

The Centre for Translation & Intercultural Studies at Manchester set up the first and still largest dedicated corpus of translational language, The Translational English Corpus (TEC), in 1998, with a view to exploring specific features of translated language that set it apart from other instances of language use.

Drawing on this long experience of working with corpora of translated text, the Centre is now embarking on a new phase of research that focuses on the use of corpora of (re)translations to trace the development of key concepts, primarily in the humanities, and explore the way they are adapted as they enter new cultural and temporal spaces.

This talk discusses ways in which the new corpora being compiled can build on existing TEC software and expand it in order to capture key concepts and explore their transformation across time.

Prof. Mona Baker is leader of the Translational English Corpus project and author of various articles on the use of corpora in translation research. The talk was delivered on 17 November 2012 as part of the workshop 'Travelling Theory in the Sciences and Humanities: Corpus Tools and Methodologies for Tracing the Mutation and Transformation of Concepts in (Re)translated Texts', organised by the Centre for Translation and Intercultural Studies, University of Manchester.

Edward Said discusses the themes of his classic work "orientalism", its implications and its place in the modern world.

This video shows how to create a termbase from an excel file. This should be very useful for all translators to include any custom glossaries in the TermBases they use in Trados. The video is in Arabic.

An unanticipated visit by HRH Prince Hassan bin Talal of Jordan to the Translation & Interpreting Studies Workshop. The workshop is part of an initiative by the British Academy and the Council for British Research in the Levant (CBRL) to support university academics in the Middle East and North Africa Region. Part II

An unanticipated visit by HRH Prince Hassan bin Talal of Jordan to the Translation & Interpreting Studies Workshop. The workshop is part of an initiative by the British Academy and the Council for British Research in the Levant (CBRL) to support university academics in the Middle East and North Africa Region. Part I

George Saliba has been a Professor of Arabic and Islamic Science at the Department of Middle East and Asian Languages and Cultures, Columbia University, New York, United States, since 1979. Having gained a Master of Science degree in Semitic Languages and a doctorate in Islamic Sciences from the University of California, Berkeley, he is the recipient of numerous awards and honours including the History of Science Prize given by the Third World Academy of Science in 1993 and the History of Astronomy Prize in 1996 from the Kuwait Foundation for the Advancement of Science.

On his website he describes himself as studying ‘the development of scientific ideas from late antiquity till early modern times, with a special focus on the various planetary theories that were developed within the Islamic civilization and the impact of such theories on early European astronomy."

George Saliba has been a Professor of Arabic and Islamic Science at the Department of Middle East and

Asian Languages and Cultures, Columbia University, New York, United States, since 1979. Having gained a Master of Science degree in Semitic Languages and a doctorate in Islamic Sciences from the University of California, Berkeley, he is the recipient of numerous awards and honours including the History of Science Prize given by the Third World Academy of Science in 1993 and the History of Astronomy Prize in 1996 from the Kuwait Foundation for the Advancement of Science.

On his website he describes himself as studying ‘the development of scientific ideas from late antiquity till early modern times, with a special focus on the various planetary theories that were developed within the Islamic civilization and the impact of such theories on early European astronomy."

Christian Salmon unveils the mechanics of a storytelling machine which dominates the discourses of consumption, citizenship, and society at large. He speaks in French but consecutive interpreting is provided in English.

 Keynote lecture given by Prof. Mona Baker in Geneva, Switzerland, October 2011.

Part 2 of a Workshop organized by IAPTI (International Association of Professional Translators and Interpreters) in Buenos Aires, Argentina, September 2010.

Part I of a Workshop organized by IAPTI (International Association of Professional Translators and Interpreters) in Buenos Aires, Argentina, September 2010.

Alaa Al Aswany, auhor of Yacoubian Building and Chicago, Samia Mehrez, professor of Arabic literature at AUC and Mark Linz, director of the AUC Press speak on a panel on the culture of Arabic writing and translation. This panel is a part of the inauguration week of the New Cairo campus for the American University in Cairo.

The Center for Translation Studies held its second event in its Fall 2010 lecture series, In Translation, featuring French-Arabic translator Richard Jacquemond, who delivered an Arabic lecture titled "Translation in the Arab World: Policies and Practice." In his lecture, Jacquemond proposed an analysis of the translation policies established in the Arab world after the end of the Second World War, both by the Arab states and foreign powers. Jacquemond noted that these policies have consistently considered translation as a key of modernization and development processes and are closely connected to an ideology of nation- and state-building.

In the first of its lecture series, In Translation, AUCs newly established Center for Translation Studies, hosted leading Arabic-English translator Denys Johnson-Davies who shared his memories and encounters with Arab writers during his extensive literary career, including Naguib Mahfouz, Tawfik Al Hakim, Yusuf Idris, Yahya Hakki, Edwar Al Kharrat, Tayeb Saleh and Salwa Bakr.

Alaa Al Aswany, auhor of Yacoubian Building and Chicago, Samia Mehrez, professor of Arabic literature at AUC and Mark Linz, director of the AUC Press speak on a panel on the culture of Arabic writing and translation. This panel is a part of the inauguration week of the New Cairo campus for the American University in Cairo.

In this lecture delivered at the Royal Society, Charles Burnett traces the stages in the discovery by European scholars of Arabic culture from the early middle ages until the early-modern period, through their translations of secular and religious works from Arabic into Latin. He addresses questions such as:

  • Why did the early European scholars, including some founders of the Royal Society, study Arabic?
  • How did the acquisition of manuscripts take place?
  • How was the study of Arabic established in European universities?

What is interpreting and what makes a good interpreter. Dick, formerly organiser of EU Commission interpreter training course and subsequently trainer of trainers, tells us.

Thomas describes how translators and interpreters work and discusses the similarities and differences.
 

‘Tears of Gaza’, a documentary film by Vibeke Lokkeberg.

"A Day in the Life of Real Interpreters" by director Sydney Pollack is an interesting look at the challenges of simultaneous interpretation, explained by Diana Liao, Chief of the Interpretation Service at the UN, and Brigitte Andreassier-Pearl, Chief of the French section of the Interpretation Service at the UN. Pollack discusses the intention of the scenes on which he comments, what he added after shooting and took out in editing and why: story, locations, and some technical challenges.
© Universal Pictures

 

 

Dick, formerly organiser of EU Commission interpreter training course and subsequently trainer of trainers, tells and in his own words how to avoid the potential pit-falls of poor note-taking? 

 

Director: Pier Paolo Giarolo | Producer: Outroad Di Pier Paolo Giarolo | Genre: Documentary | Produced In: 2008 | Story Teller's Country: Italy

Synopsis: Translating tells about the journey of words from a language to another. Translators are used to face words, to follow their traces and force them into new spaces. Translators have to master not only a language but also what’s behind it: an entire culture and an idea of the world; that’s why we have asked ten translators to come with us in this journey through words and languages and take us to discover these worlds. Every language is a sound and the translator is a sort of musician. We find a musical instrument beside every language: conservatory students try to perform the same sheet of music translating the same melody into their own instrument. Language is also a mixture and the translator is a baker who prepares the bread everyday. In every country we can find different shapes of bread, made by the same ingredients. Language, like bread, is an alchemy we put on the table and eat everyday. To make this documentary, I put translators together with musicians and bakers. Each of them tells about an aspect of translating. The translator at his desk explains its deep sense, the musician with his own instrument makes us listen to the sound, the night baker reveals his mixture.

Original Arabic and Voiced Over English Versions of Hosni' Mubarak's Speech on 28 Janaury 2011, as shown live on Nile International and Al Jazeera. This is useful data for analysis. Other translations of this speech (voiced over or subtitled, into English and other languages) should be easy to locate on the internet.

An introduction to Pierre Bourdieu's core concepts, by Kari Alexander.

Edward Said on Culture and Imperialism.

Edward Said discusses the themes of his classic work Orientalism, its implications and its place in the modern world.

Salman Rushdie criticizes America for its paucity of translated works.

The "See Hear" programme visits BBC’s subtitling company, Red Bee Media, to see first hand how subtitles are created and what can be done to improve the quality of subtitling in the future. Note: this clip cannot be viewed outside the UK because of restrictions imposed by the BBC.

Interview by Dr Morven Beaton-Thome about 2nd edition of In Other Words: A Coursebook on Translation (Routledge, 2011).